MAC In the News

Minnesota Alliance on Crime

The Minnesota Alliance on Crime connects systems, service providers, and victims to advance the response for victims of all crime.

MAC is a membership coalition of more than 90 crime victim service organizations in Minnesota, including prosecution-based victim/witness programs, community programs, law enforcement agencies, civil legal organizations, and also individuals committed to supporting crime victims. We support our membership through training, technical assistance, resources, public policy and legislative initiatives, and networking opportunities.

We also work to respond to current events and ensure that victims’ voices are heard.

MAC Statements Responding to Current Events

Minnesota Alliance on Crime Statement on the

Buffalo, NY Mass Shooting and Hate Crime

The Minnesota Alliance on Crime (MAC) is appalled and saddened to learn about yet another mass shooting in our country. A white, 18-year-old gunman allegedly carried out a racist attack at a supermarket in Buffalo, N.Y., on Saturday, killing 10 people and injuring three others, according to authorities. Almost all of the victims were Black. The suspect has been charged with first-degree murder. If convicted, he would face a maximum sentence of life without parole.

Officials are investigating the mass shooting as a racially motivated hate crime. Separately, the FBI is investigating the shooting as both a hate crime and racially motivated violent extremism. MAC extends our deepest condolences to the families and friends of the victims and to all those injured in this senseless act of violence.

Gun violence is a growing public health crisis in America and in Minnesota. Guns are associated with far too many tragic deaths in our state. MAC has advocated for gun safety, including background checks of prospective gun buyers, safe gun storage, laws implementing extreme risk protective orders, and increased funding for research into the psychological and societal factors that lead to gun violence.

This particular mass shooting highlights the ongoing problem in communities around the country and here in Minnesota, of racial violence and injustice. MAC’s core values oppose the use of all forms of violence and affirm the basic human right of every person to live without fear or the threat of victimization throughout the course of one’s life. We seek a criminal justice system that is fair and accessible to all crime victims, and where meaningful rights for crime victims are routinely honored. We stand in solidarity with efforts around the world to end all forms of discrimination, exploitation, victimization, and violence. We recognize that forms of oppression based on race, gender/gender identity, class, ethnicity, nationality, immigration status, disability, age, religion and sexual orientation create a climate of supremacy and ownership that facilitates the use of ongoing violence and victimization. We believe in the strength of diversity, embrace the differences among ourselves and within our communities, and promote the development of leadership in all communities.

Once again, MAC calls on the Minnesota leaders to condemn race-based violence and take-action to root out institutional racism and oppression that is very much alive in state and national criminal/legal systems. We ask local and national leaders to speak out against the insidious and false “Replacement Theory” that is flaming the fire of racism and inciting horrific acts of hate crime. All Minnesotans, especially people of color, should feel and be safe in their own communities. We call on the Minnesota Legislature to not only condemn racism and the violence that stems from it, but to use their power to vote for measures to hold individuals and system accountable.

The Minnesota Alliance on Crime (MAC) is deeply saddened and angered by actions of officers employed by the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD). On May25, 2020 a video taken by a witness shows, Derek Chauvin, a white MPD officer’s use of excessive force on George Floyd, a Black man, and the willful choice, of officers Derek Chauvin, Tou Thoa, and other officers involved, to ignore George Floyd’s cries for help when he was no longer able to breathe comfortably and eventually was rendered unconscious.  This recorded incident shines a glaring light on the fact that the very institution charged to ‘Protect and Serve’ ALL community members is responsible for perpetrating on-going violence and oppression onto community members who are Black and Brown and causing the death of Black males.

MAC opposes the use of all forms of violence and affirms the basic human right of every person to live without fear or the threat of victimization throughout the course of one’s life.  

MAC seeks a criminal legal system that is fair and accessible to ALL community members, especially those who are most marginalized.

MAC stands in solidarity with efforts in Minnesota to end all forms of institutionalized discrimination, exploitation, victimization, oppression, and violence.

MAC recognizes that forms of oppression based on race, ethnicity, nationality, and immigration status create a climate of white supremacy and white nationalism that facilitate the use of ongoing institutionally sanctioned violence and victimization. 

MAC calls on MPD Chief of Police, Medaria Arradondo, and Minneapolis Mayor, Jacob Frey, to respond immediately with a plan to address the rampant racism that exists within the institution of the MPD and to listen to community leaders who know best how to police their communities in a safe and humane way.

MAC further calls on all agencies investigating the actions of all officers involved to hold them accountable to the greatest degree possible. The entire state and nation are watching, unfortunately again, while decisions are made regarding what the life of a Black male community member is worth. Being black and brown should not be a death sentence in Minnesota.

The Minnesota Alliance on Crime (MAC) is deeply saddened and angered by actions of officers employed by the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD). On May25, 2020 a video taken by a witness shows, Derek Chauvin, a white MPD officer’s use of excessive force on George Floyd, a Black man, and the willful choice, of officers Derek Chauvin, Tou Thoa, and other officers involved, to ignore George Floyd’s cries for help when he was no longer able to breathe comfortably and eventually was rendered unconscious.  This recorded incident shines a glaring light on the fact that the very institution charged to ‘Protect and Serve’ ALL community members is responsible for perpetrating on-going violence and oppression onto community members who are Black and Brown and causing the death of Black males.

MAC opposes the use of all forms of violence and affirms the basic human right of every person to live without fear or the threat of victimization throughout the course of one’s life.  

MAC seeks a criminal legal system that is fair and accessible to ALL community members, especially those who are most marginalized.

MAC stands in solidarity with efforts in Minnesota to end all forms of institutionalized discrimination, exploitation, victimization, oppression, and violence.

MAC recognizes that forms of oppression based on race, ethnicity, nationality, and immigration status create a climate of white supremacy and white nationalism that facilitate the use of ongoing institutionally sanctioned violence and victimization. 

MAC calls on MPD Chief of Police, Medaria Arradondo, and Minneapolis Mayor, Jacob Frey, to respond immediately with a plan to address the rampant racism that exists within the institution of the MPD and to listen to community leaders who know best how to police their communities in a safe and humane way.

MAC further calls on all agencies investigating the actions of all officers involved to hold them accountable to the greatest degree possible. The entire state and nation are watching, unfortunately again, while decisions are made regarding what the life of a Black male community member is worth. Being black and brown should not be a death sentence in Minnesota.

The Minnesota Alliance on Crime (MAC) is deeply saddened and angered by actions of officers employed by the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD). On May25, 2020 a video taken by a witness shows, Derek Chauvin, a white MPD officer’s use of excessive force on George Floyd, a Black man, and the willful choice, of officers Derek Chauvin, Tou Thoa, and other officers involved, to ignore George Floyd’s cries for help when he was no longer able to breathe comfortably and eventually was rendered unconscious.  This recorded incident shines a glaring light on the fact that the very institution charged to ‘Protect and Serve’ ALL community members is responsible for perpetrating on-going violence and oppression onto community members who are Black and Brown and causing the death of Black males.

MAC opposes the use of all forms of violence and affirms the basic human right of every person to live without fear or the threat of victimization throughout the course of one’s life.  

MAC seeks a criminal legal system that is fair and accessible to ALL community members, especially those who are most marginalized.

MAC stands in solidarity with efforts in Minnesota to end all forms of institutionalized discrimination, exploitation, victimization, oppression, and violence.

MAC recognizes that forms of oppression based on race, ethnicity, nationality, and immigration status create a climate of white supremacy and white nationalism that facilitate the use of ongoing institutionally sanctioned violence and victimization. 

MAC calls on MPD Chief of Police, Medaria Arradondo, and Minneapolis Mayor, Jacob Frey, to respond immediately with a plan to address the rampant racism that exists within the institution of the MPD and to listen to community leaders who know best how to police their communities in a safe and humane way.

MAC further calls on all agencies investigating the actions of all officers involved to hold them accountable to the greatest degree possible. The entire state and nation are watching, unfortunately again, while decisions are made regarding what the life of a Black male community member is worth. Being black and brown should not be a death sentence in Minnesota.

MAC in the news:

Dodging Bullets Documentary—Stories from Survivors of Historical Trauma
Friday, September 10, 2021
1:00  to 3:00 pm
Best of Fest Award – Minneapolis/St. Paul International Film Festival
This event is open to MAC Members only.

America’s fickle love affair with Native Americans is limited to revisionist stories of passive Indian maidens like Pocahontas and Sacajawea or fierce doomed warriors like Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. But when we look beneath the stereotypes and understand the issues and statistics of what’s really happening in Indian Country, the truth is surprising, complex, and frustrating. There are spiritual, psychological, and physical wounds experienced in large numbers of the Native American population and these hurts have a name, historical trauma.

Dodging Bullets, a Minnesota-made documentary, confronts historictral trauma head-on through interviews and discussions with young Native Americans whose lives are stricken with the effects of historical trauma. The film explores research by professionals whose work helps develop a better understanding of trauma, how it relates to Native Americans specifically and provides insight into ways we can improve the outcomes of Native people dealing with these challenges.

For more information, including a trailer, visit www.dodgingbullets.com.

https://www.redlakenationnews.com/story/2021/04/29/news/liz-richards-to-lead-victim-services-programs-for-minnesota-department-of-corrections/97663.html

April 29, 2021

Liz Richards

St. Paul, Minn. – The Minnesota Department of Corrections (DOC) announces Liz Richards will lead the DOC’s victim services programs, effective July 1, 2021. Richards is currently the Executive Director of Violence Free Minnesota.

When Richards joins the DOC, she will direct the DOC’s victim assistance work statewide.

“The Department of Corrections is fortunate to have Liz lead this important work for our agency. Her extensive experience and work with community-based programs across our state will elevate our goal of providing responsive and fully coordinated services to crime victims,” said Commissioner Paul Schnell. “Liz’s background in researching, developing, and promoting operational and legislative policies that foster community safety and victim healing will play a critical role in helping us fulfill our mission of “transforming lives for a safer Minnesota,” Schnell added.

Richards has over thirty years of experience working with victims and associated programs. As the Executive Director of Violence Free Minnesota she leads staff in advancing public policy, increasing public awareness, and strengthening advocacy programming for victim/survivors of domestic & sexual violence.

Bobbi Holtberg, Executive Director of the Minnesota Alliance on Crime, has worked with Richards in several capacities over the last 15 years.

“Liz’s commitment to the field of victim services is unwavering and her passion for person centered advocacy is unmatched,” Holtberg said. “Liz has a documented history of building mutually beneficial relationships, with internal and external stakeholders, that result in strengthened support and services for victims of crime. Liz will be a tremendous asset at DOC.”

Prior to working at Violence Free Minnesota, Liz was a family law attorney in private practice working in both rural and urban counties. She has worked at the non-profits Standpoint and Domestic Abuse Project, and within the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office. Liz Richards is a Minnesota licensed attorney.

“I am excited to bring in my experience and merge it with the knowledge already present within DOC,” said Richards. “I see my role as building bridges between the community and the DOC to meet the needs of victim/survivors and their families.”

To learn more about the DOC’s current victim assistance programs, visit: mn.gov/doc/victims

To learn more about Violence Free Minnesota, visit: vfmn.org

https://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/SessionDaily/Story/15794

Bill would boost ‘woefully inadequate’ funds for crime victims by $8 million

Crime victims can apply for emergency state funds to help them recover from what they have suffered.

But only $150,000 is available in that emergency fund annually. Rep. Athena Hollins (DFL-St. Paul) calls that “woefully inadequate” to meet the needs of crime victims.

She sponsors HF861, which would boost funding to $4 million in each of the upcoming two fiscal years with the expectation of that becoming the base appropriation.

The House Public Safety and Criminal Justice Reform Finance and Policy Committee held the bill over Tuesday for possible omnibus bill inclusion. The companion, SF2104, sponsored by Sen. Sandra Pappas (DFL-St. Paul), awaits action by the Senate Judiciary and Public Safety Finance and Policy Committee.

Appropriated dollars would go to the Office of Justice Programs in the Department of Public Safety for grants to victim survivors of crime to support their needs and alleviate the impact of crime on them.

The intent of the legislation is that grants would primarily be available to domestic and sexual violence victims, Hollins said.

The office would be required to develop eligibility requirements for grant recipients and mechanisms for distributing funds in consultation with Violence Free MinnesotaMinnesota Coalition Against Sexual AssaultMinnesota Alliance on CrimeMinnesota Indian Women’s Sexual Assault Coalition and Sacred Hoop Coalition.

“Direct financial assistance helps with the mitigation of chaotic situations, and provides safety, security, and stability for victims and survivors,” said Artika Roller, executive director of the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault.

In the aftermath of a domestic or sexual assault, a victim is focused on the immediate needs of being safe, which often means paying rent on a new place, Roller said.

Removing a victim from an unsafe domestic situation is critical, said Katie Kramer, policy director of Violence Free Minnesota.

“Providing a victim of domestic violence with money to secure stable housing not only reduces rates of homelessness, it also reduces rates of future violence,” Kramer said.

Greater Minnesota would benefit greatly from these funds, Roller said, as crime victim services are particularly scarce outside of the metro area.

AG Balderas And Identity Theft Resource Center To Assist COVID-19 Scam Victims With Phone Bank Event

AG News:

SANTA FE — The New Mexico Identity Theft Coalition, under the leadership of the New Mexico Office of the Attorney General, and the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, announced Thursday that they will hold a phone bank as part of a nationwide effort to help victims of COVID-19 scams and identity crime.

Anyone who has been the victim of a COVID-19 scam or identity theft can call in during this time for resources and direct assistance.

“Unfortunately our current state of emergency creates a ripe environment for scams and people trying to take advantage of vulnerable New Mexicans,” Attorney General Hector Balderas said. “We must continue to protect and educate families, and my office will prosecute any person who tries to harm them.”

Details for the event are as follows:

The New Mexico Office of the Attorney General (NMOAG), NM Identity Theft Coalition – serving New Mexico, 505.318.1008 in Albuquerque or toll free at 888.660.8801.

  • Monday 1p.m.-5 p.m.
  • Tuesday 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Additionally, victims can contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530, or live-chat with an expert advisor at  https://www.idtheftcenter.org/.

COVID-19-related scam and identity crime topics the ITRC will focus on during the phone bank:

  • Unemployment benefits identity theft
  • Romance scams
  • Payment platform scams
  • Small Business COVID-19 loan relief scams
  • Coerced debt impacted COVID-19 scams

The phone bank is part of a national effort by the National Identity Theft Victim Assistance Network (NITVAN) to assist individuals who have been victimized by COVID-19 related scams.

NITVAN was launched in 2010 with funding from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime, through the Crime Victims Fund. This unique fund is financed by fines and penalties paid by convicted federal offenders, not from tax dollars. The ITRC became the network leader in October 2016.

Through the grant project, 11 new coalitions have been established to expand and improve victim assistance services in their respective states or regions, including the New Mexico Identity Theft Coalition under the leadership of the New Mexico Office of the Attorney General. Through the development and enhancement of these coalitions, victim service providers can better address the rights and needs of victims of identity crime through collaboration, training, and outreach.

The coalition provides coordinated comprehensive services and support for victims of identity theft and fraud; provide training resources for law enforcement agencies, victim assistance organizations and other related organizations to ensure a well-educated, quality response in cases of ID theft and fraud; and provide community educational programs regarding ID theft, fraud and prevention options to reduce the risk of victimization and/or re-victimization.

For additional information on the coalitions, visit http://www.nitvan.org/.

Additional participants hosting phone banks across the country include:

  • The National Cybersecurity Society
  • Vera House, Onondaga County Elder Identity Theft Coalition
  • Texas Council on Family Violence
  • Texas Coalition on Coerced Debt
  • Colorado Bureau of Investigation
  • Identity Theft Advocacy Network (ITAN)
  • Lifespan of Greater Rochester
  • Finger Lakes (NY) Senior Identity Theft Coalition
  • ITRC on behalf of Minnesota Alliance on Crime
  • Minnesota Identity Theft and Cybercrime Information and Resource Network
  • ITRC on behalf of Cybercrime Support Network, Cybercrime Support Network of West Michigan

https://www.prweb.com/releases/nitvan_coalitions_and_identity_theft_resource_center_partner_to_help_covid_19_identity_crime_victims/prweb17425933.htm

NITVAN Coalitions and Identity Theft Resource Center Partner to Help COVID-19 Identity Crime Victims

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The ITRC and local identity theft assistance coalitions will host a phone bank September 28-30 toll-free at 888.400.5530 for victims of COVID-19-related scams and identity crime.

The Identity Theft Resource Center will host a phone bank Sept. 28-30 with NITVAN coalition leaders for COVID-19-related scams and identity crime.

NITVAN & ITRC Phone Bank

“This phone bank is a great opportunity for the ITRC to empower and guide the thousands of victims of a scam or identity theft due to COVID-19,” said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center.”

Today, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crimes, is kicking off a three-day phone bank to help victims of COVID-19 scams and identity crimes. Some COVID-19-related scam and identity crime topics the ITRC will focus on during the phone bank include:

  • Unemployment benefits identity theft
  • Romance scams
  • Payment platform scams
  • Small Business COVID-19 loan relief scams

“COVID-19 has created this opportunity for scammers that is unparalleled, said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center. “This phone bank is a great opportunity for the ITRC to empower and guide the thousands of victims of a scam or identity theft due to COVID-19.”

The phone bank, which will be held September 28-30 from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST, will include participation from the following National Identity Theft Victim Assistance Network (NITVAN) coalitions:

New Mexico Office of the Attorney General (NMOAG), NMOAG Identity Theft Coalition – serving New Mexico, 505.318.5424 (local) or 888.660.8801

  • Monday 1-5 p.m. EST/10 a.m.-2 p.m. PST
  • Tuesday 9 a.m.-1 p.m. EST/6-10 a.m. PST

The National Cybersecurity Society – serving nationwide, 703.340.7757

  • Monday 11 a.m.-1 p.m. EST, 2-8 p.m. EST/8-10 a.m. PST, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. PST
  • Tuesday 9-11 a.m. EST, 2-8 p.m. EST/6-8 a.m. PST, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. PST
  • Wednesday 9 a.m.-8 p.m. EST/ 6 a.m-5 p.m. PST

Vera House, Onondaga County Elder Identity Theft Coalition – serving New York, 315.425.0818 ext. 2219

  • Monday 10 a.m.-2 p.m. EST/7-11 a.m. PST

Texas Council on Family Violence, Texas Coalition on Coerced Debt – serving Texas, 210.880.5424; texascoalitiononcoerceddebt@gmail.com

  • Tuesday 12-2 p.m. CST, 4-6 p.m. CST/10 a.m.-12 p.m. PST, 2-4 p.m. PST

Colorado Bureau of Investigation, Identity Theft Advocacy Network (ITAN) of Colorado – serving Colorado, 303.239.4242

  • Tuesday-Wednesday 8 a.m.-4 p.m. MST/ 7 a.m-3 p.m. PST

Lifespan of Greater Rochester, Finger Lakes (NY) Identity Theft Coalition – Serving New York, 585.287.6371

  • Wednesday 9 a.m.-2 p.m. EST/6-11 a.m. PST

ITRC on behalf of Minnesota Alliance on Crime, Minnesota Identity Theft and Cybercrime Information and Resource Network (MITCIRN) – serving Minnesota, 888.400.5530

  • Monday-Wednesday 8 a.m.-3 p.m. CST/ 6 a.m-5 p.m. PST

ITRC on behalf of Cybercrime Support Network, Cybercrime Support Network of West Michigan – Serving West Michigan, 888.400.5530

  • Monday-Wednesday 9 a.m.-8 p.m. EST/ 6 a.m-5 p.m. PST

Victims of a COVID-19 scam or identity crime can contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530, or live-chat with an expert advisor on our website https://www.idtheftcenter.org/.

NITVAN was launched in 2010 with funding from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime, through the Crime Victims Fund. This unique fund is financed by fines and penalties paid by convicted federal offenders, not from tax dollars. The ITRC became the network leader in October 2016. Through the grant project, 11 new coalitions have been established to expand and improve victim assistance services in their respective states or regions. Through the development and enhancement of these coalitions, victim service providers can better address the rights and needs of victims of identity crime.

For additional information on the coalitions, visit http://www.nitvan.org/.

About the Identity Theft Resource Center®

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud and privacy issues. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its contact center, website, social media channels, live-chat feature and I.D. Theft Help app. For more information, visit https://www.idtheftcenter.org.

MEDIA CONTACT

Identity Theft Resource Center
Alex Achten
Earned & Owned Media Specialist
888.400.5530 Ext. 3611
media@idtheftcenter.org

Minnesota BCA hiring for new officer-involved shooting victim liaison position

Over the past few years, there have been several high-profile officer-involved shootings in Minnesota, including Jamar Clark, Philando Castille, Thurman Blevens and Justine Damond.

Now, the people most directly affected by the shootinsg will get some help from a new employee at the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

https://www.presspubs.com/shoreview/news/ramsey-county-attorney-s-office-adds-facility-dog/article_c74d560e-a28f-11e9-806f-bfbe84a06ed5.html

Ramsey County Attorney’s Office adds facility dog

  •  Updated 
Ramsey County Attorney’s Office adds facility dog

The Ramsey County Attorney’s Office recently received a facility dog who will provide quiet companionship to both adult and child victims and witnesses of crime through difficult moments of the prosecution process. Norie’s handler is Victim Advocate Bill Kubes.

The Ramsey County Attorney’s Office (RCAO) has joined the growing ranks of prosecutors’ offices across the country to employ the services of specially trained facility dogs whose sole purpose is to provide quiet companionship to adults and children who are victims of and witnesses to crime.

Norie, a 2-year-old purebred golden retriever, received comprehensive training from Helping Paws Inc. of Hopkins, which is accredited by Assistance Dogs International. She lives and works with RCAO handler Bill Kubes, a victim/witness advocate.

“Crime victims, especially children, are often under unimaginable stress,” said Ramsey County Attorney John Choi. “Participating in the adversarial court process can come at a high cost, and this program will make that process better for those who need the services of Norie.”

Once a case has been charged by the county attorney, both victims and witnesses are offered the services of the RCAO Victim/Witness Division. Through work with the Minnesota Alliance on Crime, which helped develop the protocol, the RCAO determined in 2014 that a facility dog could greatly assist its work. Unlike service dogs who are trained to assist one individual, facility dogs can work with more than one handler.

“Norie is a highly trained facility dog with one primary purpose — putting victims of and witnesses to crime at ease so that they can better participate in the prosecution process and ease the natural tension that comes with a highly traumatic experience,” said RCAO Victim/Witness Division Director Tami McConkey. “The return on this investment is immeasurable.”

The RCAO will spend approximately $8,000 a year for the care, feeding, ongoing training and related costs of supporting a working facility dog. Nationally, 13 courthouses across the country have at least one assistance dog, including the Hennepin County Juvenile Justice Center. Nearly 60 prosecutors’ offices and a handful of public defenders’ offices have at least one dog onsite to provide similar services. Due to the generosity of Helping Paws, there were no initial costs to obtain Norie.

“We felt that Norie’s skill set and temperament matched perfectly with the work and staff at the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office,” said Sue Kliewer, client services coordinator and instructor for Helping Paws. “We make sure that each of our trained dogs maintains certification for as long as they are placed at an agency.”

https://www.mnbar.org/resources/publications/bench-bar/columns/2019/06/17/commission-on-judicial-selection-recommends-10th-judicial-district-candidates-to-gov.-walz
B&B_NEW_LOGO_400

Commission on Judicial Selection recommends 10th Judicial District candidates to Gov. Walz

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
June 11, 2019
Contact: Teddy Tschann
teddy.tschann@state.mn.us
651-402-8841

Commission on Judicial Selection Recommends Tenth Judicial District Candidates to Governor Walz 

[ST. PAUL, MN] – The Commission on Judicial Selection announced today it is recommending three candidates for consideration to fill the current vacancy in Minnesota’s Tenth Judicial District. This vacancy occurred upon the resignation of the Honorable Daniel A. O’Fallon and will be chambered at the city of Anoka in Anoka County.

Suzanne Brown: Ms. Brown is currently head of the criminal division in the Scott County Attorney’s Office, where she handles criminal cases that include homicide, criminal sexual conduct, assault, property crimes, and drug offenses. Previously, Brown was an assistant Scott County attorney in Scott County, and her work within the Adult Criminal Division earned her an award from the Minnesotans for Safe Driving for “extraordinary efforts and dedication to public safety.” Her community involvement includes the Minnesota Department of Education Bias and Sensitivity Advisory Panel, the 11th District Community Curriculum Advisory Council, the 11th District Student Services Committee, and several local organizations found within Scott County.

Jessica Rugani: Ms. Rugani is currently an assistant attorney within the Criminal Division of the Anoka County Attorney’s Office. Within this role, Rugani designed and implemented Minnesota’s first pre-charge diversion program in 2008, and she continues to draft recommendations for drug prosecution policies that favor treatment and shorter probation over incarceration. Previously, Rugani was an assistant attorney for the City of Minneapolis, serving on a two-person team that prosecuted Minneapolis’ top 100 most-prolific misdemeanants. Her community involvement includes the Minnesota Alliance on Crime, the Diversity and Inclusion Committee of Anoka County Attorney’s Office, Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers, and other bar associations.

Robin Wolpert: Ms. Wolpert is currently an attorney in the Sapientia Law Group, focusing on white-collar criminal defense and business litigation. She also provides low bono work for state criminal and civil matters. Previously, Wolpert was an assistant Washington County attorney in the Criminal Division of the Washington County Attorney’s Office. Wolpert’s community involvement includes the Lawyers Professional Responsibility Board, the National Task Force on Lawyer Well-Being, the Merit Selection Panel for the US District Court for the District of Minnesota, and the Minnesota State Bar Association.

Minnesota’s Tenth Judicial District consists of Anoka, Chisago, Isanti, Kanabec, Pine, Sherburne, Washington, and Wright Counties.